Community Research for Community Development


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This book focuses upon the contributions that research can make towards strengthening community development and working for social justice agendas in Britain. Drawing upon original research, as part of the Third Sector Research Capacity Building Cluster, the volume explores different ways in which research can contribute to capacity building and ‘research mindedness’ in the Third Sector. This includes the contributions that community-university research partnerships can make, enabling organisations and social movements to undertake research for themselves. Examples include research with refugee and asylum seeker organisations and groups, research with faith-based organisations and research exploring the relevance of community arts, media and sports. Whilst the book covers a number of related themes, they share an overall focus upon community development to promote active citizenship and social justice.

The Art of Nurturing Communities – A Book Review by Henry Tam

ReviewHenry Tam, the director of the Youth Participation & Democracy at the University of Cambridge discusses three main areas that our book Community Research for Community Development offers. On his blog-site Tam writes:

Governments like to turn on the rhetoric about helping communities to develop and thrive. But while some politicians genuinely support community development by investing resources in what are known to make a difference, others talk about building a ‘Big Society’ even as they embark on doing the very things evidence tells us would sap communities’ strength and destroy social cohesion.

To read Tam’s full review, you can visit his insightful blog here.

To learn more about the book, click here

Intergenerational Learning and Social Solidarity

Intergenerational learning and social solidarity The MISSH Group case study

Intergenerational Learning and Social SolidarityIntergenerational learning and social solidarity The MISSH Group case study

This research report draws on the experience of a group which was working to build social solidarity by working across generations. In the context of current government policy and the Prime Minister’s stated aim of creating a ‘big society,’ it was timely to consider the role played by intergenerational practice in the development of active citizenship.

Taking Part CBC NCIA Report

Taking part CBC NCIA ReportScreen Shot 2013-08-15 at 10.58.53

This report presents the findings of a research study undertaken as a collaborative effort between National Coalition for Independent Action (NCIA) and Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) between June and November 2012 as part of the ESRC funded ‘Taking Part Capacity Building Cluster (CBC). The inquiry explored two main questions: Where can resistance and alternatives to injustice be found? Where are the homes for such action?

Intergenerational Learning and Social Solidarity

Intergenerational Learning and Social SolidarityIntergenerational learning and social solidarity The MISSH Group case study

This research report draws on the experience of a group which was working to build social solidarity by working across generations. In the context of current government policy and the Prime Minister’s stated aim of creating a ‘big society,’ it was timely to consider the role played by intergenerational practice in the development of active citizenship.